A recent publication has thrown some major shade at the state of Arkansas. It has named three of its cities the worst in the United States to visit.

So these 3 cities were put in the same context as Chicago, Detroit, and Baltimore. If you know anything about these three cities, any city from Arkansas being put in the same category is really not very fair. This is what the publication Mind Your Dollars had to say about what these cities were chosen.

That’s because there are some places that exist that have less-than-stellar conditions for visiting, such as poverty, high crime rates, and unemployment. Other areas are just not all that exciting, despite having a name that’s “known,” or in many cases, a well-known celebrity just happened to grow up there.

So here are the three cities that this website said were part of the 40 worst cities to visit in the United States.

Little Rock

Mick Haupt Unsplash
Mick Haupt Unsplash
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Here is what the site had to say about the capital city.

Even the smallest cities can have issues with crime and poverty — things that tend to go hand in hand. Not only that but if you did happen to visit the city, there’s a good reason why postcards jokingly state that the mosquito is the state bird of Arkansas.

I have been to Little Rock numerous times and like any city has its good and bad spots. From the great shopping and dining and the activities for the kids, this town has a lot to offer.

Bentonville

Google Maps
Google Maps
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This is what they had to say about Bentonville:

That said, Bentonville is the founding location and headquarters of Walmart, and next door to the museum is the Walton Family’s original 5&10 store. If that doesn’t excite you, well…  you can scratch this city off of your travel list.

I have never been to Bentonville, but after a quick look at the downtown area through Google Maps it looks like a nice place to visit for a look into what it was like back in the day in this little town in Arkansas.

Murfreesboro

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Google Maps
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Wes Spicher
Wes Spicher
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The site had this tongue-in-cheek reason for why Murfreesboro made the list.

Murfreesboro is the home of the Crater of Diamonds State Park where you can literally dig for diamonds along with tons of other folks. It’s been open for more than a century, so a lot of people have gone digging. You’d think they would have found every diamond by now!

Here is where this really gets me. I have visited Murfreesboro many times and it is an awesome place to get away from it all. From the great places to take the kids, the lake, and the awesome cabins that are available on the river this is a wonderful place to visit.

And the person who wrote this article knows nothing about this area, We all know that they turn over the dirt in the diamond digging area and that is why they keep finding diamonds. Check out Mario's story on the latest diamond found in the Crater of Diamond State Park

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