Can you legally eat roadkill deer in Arkansas?

It is not a question you hear, but I noticed a deer on the side of the road and it looked like it had not been there too long. So it got me to thinking is it legal to pick the deer up and as long as it is not too bad can you legally eat it? I took to the internet and found some pretty interesting information.

Pascal-L-Marius
Pascal-L-Marius
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On the website, wideopeneats.com has this to say about roadkill and its consumption.

U.S. Animal rights activists and foodies alike hail roadkill as one of the most ethical and environmentally friendly meats. Advocates point out that these animals were not raised or killed for food, and argue letting people harvest roadkill makes use of a valuable free-range protein source that would otherwise go to waste.

EEI_Tony
EEI_Tony
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Did you know that over a million deer are hit in the United States each year? That is a lot of meat that can be used for feeding folks as long as it is deemed edible. Here is where it gets a little weird. Currently, you can 'Harvest' roadkill in  30 states.

When you look at what is required in most of those states, you just need a permit. When you get to Arkansas it has no requirements listed. It is actually blank. So if you want to get some roadkill and cook it you are free to d so in Arkansas with no restrictions.

But in Texas it is illegal. According to einnews.com:

Since 2007 with the passage of House Bill 12 by the 80th Texas Legislature, it is unlawful in Texas to hunt any wild bird or animal on a public road or the right-of-way of a public road. This includes Roadkill Hunting, it is unlawful to pick up roadkill.

So there you have it. In Arkansas, roadkill is free and available for you, but in Texas, it is actually against the law.

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Because the regulation of exotic animals is left to states, some organizations, including The Humane Society of the United States, advocate for federal, standardized legislation that would ban owning large cats, bears, primates, and large poisonous snakes as pets.

Read on to see which pets are banned in your home state, as well as across the nation.